How to fix your USB cable on old (and new?) Wacom tablets


Save your money and stop buying new tablets everytime you need a $2 fix. Wacom used to do this for $30 bucks + cost of shipping + warranty + naked pictures of your imouto. Spend it on alcohol so that you can forget about how crappy you are at drawing, even if only for a short time. It’ll also quiet the screams of your imouto:

Any USB wacom without a removable cable should generally use the same principle.

Stuff you will need:
1. Your broken ass tablet. (How do you know it’s the USB cable that’s fucked? The LED will be flickering on and off or just be completely off. If the light is always on when plugged in, you may just be a retard that hasn’t installed their drivers correctly or something equally stupid.)
2. A USB 2.0 cable. Technically, a USB 1.0 cable will be fine too as long as it isn’t 20ft long or something. I cut one off of an old keyboard. I stole the keyboard from some nerds. It’s probably a 1.0 cable because nerds never have nice things.
3. A soldering iron. If you burn yourself, you’re a dumbass and it’s not my fault.
4. A screwdriver.
5. about 20 minutes of your otherwise worthless life.

Step 1:
Take out all the screws and open that shit up. (my graphire 3 has four screws on the back)

You’ll see something like this.

That’s the magical sensorboard thing.

Step 2:
Flip the magical PCB over and look at the fucking wires. Write down the order of the colors; or take a photo if you’re illiterate. ALL USB 2.0 cables follow the same color code, so don’t fuck this shit up.

Mine went Red-White-Green-Black-Ground. Yours should be the same.

Now unsolder those wires. Clean that shit up (with some copper braid or solder vacuum if you’re a richfag), and solder on the wires from your new USB cable.

Plug that sonovabitch back into your favorite hole and see if it likes it. Your tablet should love it and her LED will be all bright and hot. If not, take it out of your bum and plug it into a USB jack. Still doesn’t work? You’ve fucked up and need to troubleshoot (Maybe in this order: 1-stop being a dumbass; 2-check USB port; 3-check solder points; 4-check cable; 5-go cry to your mother and get her to buy you a new tablet because you can’t fix it)

Finally works?
Put that shit together and give yourself a high-five. Because you probably don’t have any friends around you.

Now go draw some bitches. Bitches love bitches.

26 Comments

  1. Is it weird that the way you explain things turn me on?

    • You should write a book or something, panties. I agree with Enki, I love your writing style, too.

    • agreed, great writing style :P. also wtf why hasn’t wacom fixed these buggy usb cord issues yet?? i’m hearing people bitching about the intuos pro medium just as i am about to buy it…sigh.

      • This sort of damage is pretty common for all cables that get heavy use and movement. USB cables are normally composed of thin single strand wires that get brittle over time and will snap internally. Wacom could switch to something like thick multi-strand wires in their cables (like higher end headphone cables), but the added cost of a non-standard item probably outweighs the benefit. It doesn’t happen often enough to warrant concern, and it’s a pretty cheap fix if it does break.

        Wacom sort of fixed the problem with detachable cables… but now the problem is the strain being put onto the actual jack, which is unfortunately harder and more expensive to replace. They could continue trying to fix the concern with some cable relief?

        • it’s funny that you say that, because there are people fixing their broken intuos 4 jacks by… soldering the cable directly to the board

            • A
            • Posted March 4, 2015 at 5:04 pm
            • Permalink

            …I see what you did there lol and yea- one shouldnt have to do that for the company’s design flaw especially after spending several hundred dollars

  2. Oh wow, so that’s how it looks inside.

  3. I burned myself because I was soldering at 3am (4hrs into a 5hr-job).
    I think I was more tired than dumb though.

    p.s. solder vacuums SUUUUUUCKKKK
    p.p.s. release your imouto, she needs sun.

    • you can’t let imoutos run free! that’s how they turn into impure sluts.

  4. Love you!

  5. >solder vacuum if you’re a richfag
    If you’re a richfag, then you wouldn’t need to repair an old ass wacom tablet, right?

    • Maybe it’s directed at sentimental richfags?

      • i realized i fall under both those exceptions. but i still see people who have solder vacuums to be excessively lavish.

  6. All of the awards.

  7. Woo! Thanks for the guide! A friend of mine sent me her busted tablet (on request – she was just gonna throw it out otherwise and it was a nice tablet) and I forgot to write the pinouts down before I desoldered the old and (very obviously) broken cable. While I could tell which was VCC/GND based on the circuitboard, I had no idea it if it was D+ or D- after VCC. orz

    • Happy it helped.

  8. please i need a schematic how to solder the usb in wacom Intuos5

    • I don’t have an intuos5, so I can’t really help you out in detail. But if I remember correctly, it has a removable cable?

      In which case, it’s a usb 2.0 jack soldered directly onto the PCB? If so, it’ll follow the standard VCC, GND, D-, and D+ four pins. The PCB will probably have them labeled out if you follow the leads back a little. If not, you’ll need a multimeter and test each pin. Finding a compatible replacement USB jack with the same pin placement might be a bit harder (I would assume they use a standard connector, but who knows). You could go ghetto and solder a cable directly to the board (not recommended, but it’ll work).

      Unless you have a hot-air solder setup and some experience, you might be in over your head for a DIY fix. I have soldered mini-USB jacks by hand before, but it isn’t easy at all, and excruciatingly scary. The pin placement is really tight and you could easily short some leads. Probably won’t do any damage at the low voltage, but it’s a pain.

      But it’s an intuos5.. it’s probably still under wacom warranty? I would shoot them an e-mail before trying to handle it yourself.

  9. Hey sorry I know this is an older thread, but I’m having trouble with my intuos 4 tablet — both the usb ports simply broke off, and when I tried soldering the cable directly to the board (following this tutorial http://theaydin.tumblr.com/post/31005560950/how-to-repair-wacom-intuos-4-usb ) It lit up, but I received a warning that the tablet was drawing too much power.

    Could you detail the part of your last response in which you say “you could go ghetto and solder a cable directly to the board (not recommended, but it’ll work” ? I don’t have a warranty so this is my best bet before having to spend $500 on a new one.

    • hard to diagnose without having your tablet directly in front of me… but there are only a few reasons [that I can think of] for that warning:

      Shorting a connection somewhere. Desolder those wires and clean up the contact points (even the ones you are not soldering back onto). Try again.

      Used a bad cable that is shorting from one of the signal wires straight to a ground. Try a different cable.

      Bumped a resistor or cap while solder. No idea how to diagnose or fix this other than meticulously checking for anything that looks out of place.

      If you do figure out the problem, let me know.

  10. So me and my bad luck, my cat chewed through my cord. Is there still hope for me using this method?

    • yep, that sounds precisely like a problem this would fix. Assuming the cat did no damage to the actual tablet (like pee on it or something), replacing the cbale twill fix it.

      • Yeah, she didn’t do anything that douchy. Thanks panties!

  11. I’ll try this weekend. If it works, I’ll open a store to fix to another dumbs. 😀 Thanks for your help.

  12. Thanks, thanks, thanks ¡¡Thank you very much!! I couldn’t remember the order of the usb wires, now my wacom works again!!

  13. Can anyone please tell me the wires order of a genius g-pen f610? plssss


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